Marcel Haug, the men’s wheelchair division champion, has dropped out of the Boston Marathon

The 126th Boston Marathon is set to run on Monday, with thousands of participants competing in the first large-scale Patriots Day race since 2019. She pulled out of the race. Hug is the men’s wheelchair division champion, five-time Boston winner, and course record holder, while Watanabe finished ninth in last year’s Boston Marathon. Turn, and follow the vehicle ahead instead of turning from Commonwealth Street to Hereford Street. Nearly 30,000 people are enrolled in the 26.2-mile race that begins on Main Street in Hopkinton as it has since 1924. It passes through Ashland, Framingham, Natick, Wellesley and Newton before ending on Boylston Street in Boston. Race director Dave McGillivray sent a group of about 20 people from the Massachusetts National Guard who march the course annually at 6 a.m., announcing the start of the 126th Boston Marathon in Hopkinton. He told them that “the return is greater than the setback.” The race begins at 9:02 a.m. with the men’s wheelchair section, followed by the women’s wheelchair section, manual and bicyclists, and professional men and women. The Para-Athletics section begins at 9:50 a.m. Information: Road closures | Prohibited Items List The first wave of runners is scheduled to start at 10 AM and every 25 minutes another wave will start ending in Wave 4 at 11:15 AM. The field of runners represents all 50 states and more than 120 countries. Eric Blackwill, of Michigan, said the Patriots Day course is a special one. “It’s very emotional. We were just at the Red Sox game and you also got the national anthem and what the sport means to this city.” Tourism experts estimate that this year’s marathon is expected to bring in $200 million in support of the business. Officials stressed that there are no credible threats to the marathon, but security measures remain tight. The 2020 race has been called off due to the pandemic, the first since the event began in 1897, and the 2021 edition has been postponed, then held in October. That was the first fall version of the marathon. The scope was smaller for social distancing and the crowds were also smaller, although no less enthusiastic. The Boston Athletics Association is celebrating the 50th anniversary of its first official women’s division, although the eight women who lined up alongside the men that year weren’t the first to run the race. Bobby Gibb is recognized as the first woman to run Boston. It ended in 1966 among unofficial racers known as bandits. A year later, Kathryn Switzer signed the nickname “KV Switzer” and received an official bib. Race director Jock Semple tried to keep her off the track, and this year’s celebration is being celebrated with Nina Koshik’s victory in 1972. Five out of eight women are in the festivities. Valery Rogochsky, who finished sixth in the 1972 race, will run again this year with her daughters, and will be the honorary initiator of the elite women’s field, and this year the women’s field is one of the strongest of all time. Olympic gold medalist Beris Jepchercher, London and New York Marathon winner Joycelyn Jepkosgee and Ethiopia’s Digitu Azimerao all have personal bests results beating the record in Boston, where Kenyan Benson Kipruto won the men’s race in October and will try to defend his title. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

The 126th Boston Marathon is set to run on Monday as thousands of participants compete in the first large-scale Patriots Day race since 2019.

Early Monday, the Boston Athletics Association announced the withdrawal of Marcel Haug of Switzerland and Shu Watanabe of Japan from the race.

Hogg is the men’s wheelchair division champion, five-time Boston winner, and course record holder, while Watanabe finished ninth in last year’s Boston Marathon.

Last year, Hug cost himself a record $50,000 bonus when he missed the second-to-last turn, following the lead car instead of the turn from Commonwealth Street to Hereford Street.

Nearly 30,000 people are enrolled in the 26.2-mile race that begins on Main Street in Hopkinton as it has since 1924. It passes through Ashland, Framingham, Natick, Wellesley and Newton before ending on Boylston Street in Boston.

Race director Dave McGillivray sent a group of about 20 people from the Massachusetts National Guard who march the course annually at 6 a.m., announcing the start of the 126th Boston Marathon in Hopkinton. He told them that “the return is greater than the setback.”

The race begins at 9:02 a.m. with the men’s wheelchair section, followed by the women’s wheelchair section, manual and bicyclists, and professional men and women. Para Athletics starts at 9:50 a.m.

Information: Road closures | Prohibited Substances List

The first wave of runners is scheduled to start at 10 AM and every 25 minutes another wave ending with wave 4 will start at 11:15 AM

The field of runners represents all 50 states and more than 120 countries.

For some, returning to the course on Patriots Day is a special thing.

“It’s hard to describe, you know. I mean, this city is so lively and everything is going this weekend,” said Eric Blackwill, of Michigan. “It’s very touching. We were just at the Red Sox game and you also got the national anthem and what the sport means to this city.”

Tourism experts estimate that this year’s marathon is expected to bring in $200 million for businesses.

Officials stressed that there are no credible threats to the marathon, but security measures remain tight.

The 2020 race has been called off due to the pandemic, the first since the event began in 1897, and the 2021 edition has been postponed, then held in October. That was the first fall version of the marathon. Sphere was smaller for social distancing and crowds were smaller as well, although no less enthusiastic.

The Boston Athletics Association is celebrating the 50th anniversary of its first official women’s division, although the eight women who lined up alongside the men that year weren’t the first to run the race.

Bobby Gibb is recognized as the first woman to run Boston. It ended in 1966 among unofficial racers known as bandits. A year later, Kathryn Switzer signed the nickname “KV Switzer” and received an official bib. Race director Jock Semple tried to get her off the track.

The victory of Nina Koshik in 1972 is celebrated this year. Five out of eight women participate in the festivities. Valery Rogochsky, who finished sixth in the 1972 race, will run again this year with her daughters, and it will be an honorary start to the women’s elite field.

This year, the women’s field is one of the strongest ever. Olympic gold medalist Beris Jepchercher, London and New York Marathon winner Joycelyn Jepkosgee, and Ethiopia’s Digitu Azimirao all have their best faster than the record set in Boston.

Kenyan Benson Kipruto won the men’s race in October and will try to defend his title.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.